Home Sweet Home

Day 6, August 10

A decent night’s rest and drying out is what I needed most before the final push home. And, it was to be a short one, only 275 miles—about a five hour ride.

Checked out of the motel. Gassed up and headed north on I-75. Of course this tour would not be complete unless I had to pull over one more time and don the rain gear. Yes. Rain gear … again.

It was a fine mist and light rain that lasted about 30-40 minutes south of Lexington, Kentucky. When I was out from under it, I just kept going with the rain gear on. It’s more convenient to leave it on that to take it off, and have to put it back on again somewhere down the road.

I stopped for gas again in Georgetown. While I was attending to the bike and fuel, two young men approached me and said, “Nice looking bike. How does it ride?” The motorcycle sure does draw attention, and like my wife says, it’s the catalyst for those chance encounters with people on the road.

I rolled into my neighborhood and up onto the sidewalk in front of the house where I usually wash the bike. Inside, I was welcomed with a long warm hug and kisses from my lover, my best friend, my wife, Lin. It’s good to be home.

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More thoughts and ramblings are coming. Until next time.

See you on the highway.

Brent

Roads that intrigue

Are you intrigued by roads? Highways that seem to go off into the distance? Are you compelled to see what is down this road or that one?

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I was talking with a friend about differences in roads. He lives in Montenegro, Europe. I’m here in the Cincinnati, Ohio area of the USA. It was my first Facebook video chat, and it was wonderful to finally see his face and hear his voice.

Goran says travel in Europe is quite different than the USA. The roads there are not like the United States where highways can be straight as an arrow, like out west, and you can see for miles. European roads are through mountains and valleys. The curves can reduce speed and require more time to travel. Our conversation gave me pause for thought about highways and roads, and their intrigue.

I have been known to turn down a road because it looks interesting. Where does it go? Where does it connect or come out? What will I see along its path?

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Does it have lines? Lines? Yes, lines. Major highways and most roads have lane markings. But those rural country roads like Halls Creek Road (top photo) have no lines. To my knowledge and according to the Warren County map, it is such a minor road to serve the locals, that the county has not given it a County Route number. It is only known by its name. And of course, it meanders along Halls Creek, from whence its name comes.

What about gravel roads? Well, I’ve never seen anybody attempt lane markings on a gravel road. Would be kind of silly, wouldn’t it. But, that gravel road goes somewhere. A friend in Nevada, J. Brandon, says, “We have state routes that are gravel!”

That’s the intrigue of roads. There is a history and a purpose. And, they carry us forward to sights and sounds we might never have seen before. Roads are much more than a convenience for travel, they connect people to places and other people. They connect history and stories. And of course, they take us on our adventure.

If you want to get somewhere as fast as possible, take the interstate highway. But if you want to see anything, take a road less traveled. See where it leads.

See you on the highway.

Brent

Give me that old time mountain music

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Folk music has its followers around the world, and even more so is the music that comes from our own Appalachian region here in the United States. So, the opportunity to listen and and see a little culture is an experience to grab hold of.

I like that mountain music. It’s the roots of blue grass. There is nothing like it, and it’s common enough that you can have a group of musicians gather with a banjo, guitar, mandolin and fiddle, and you’ve got a band. That’s all it takes. Sure, you can throw in a bass, but you rarely see drums or any kind of percussion instrument.

Grab a bite to eat, something to drink, sit back and just listen. Let the music carry you away to the oldest mountains in the USA—the Appalachians. Yes, they are much older than the Rockies according to geologists. Not as high because they’ve been worn down, but older.

John Denver can take you home on country roads, but I’d really like to just fly, fly away. Listening to that old time mountain music can do that for me.

I need to find more festivals to attend.

See you on the highway.

Brent

Rails to Trails through the countryside

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There was a time when people feared the conversion of abandoned railroad beds into bicycle and walking paths. The fear was that crime would increase. Adjoining properties would be impacted by lower property values. How wrong were those naysayers.

Brent

Photo: Little Miami Recreational Trail, Morrow, Ohio. The LMRT is 75 miles long connecting multiple small and larger cities—all paved.