Veterans give back with a fish fry

To show appreciation for each other and the volunteers of Cincinnati PHWFF, the veterans decided to give back with a fish fry, and not just any ordinary fish fry.

Text and photos by D. Brent Miller published by Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing, Inc.

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See you on the highway … or maybe on a stream somewhere.

Brent

Photography Workshop Session 3

Below is the abstract of today’s Veteran’s Photography Workshop lesson plan. The assignment is at the bottom.

Two types of light meters:

Reflective: Measure how much light bounces off a subject. Most cameras have this type of meter and it calculates the scene and the amount of light to produce a medium grey or average scene.

Incident: Measures how much light is actually falling on the subject. These are typically hand-held devices and are very accurate.

Rule of thumb metering: f16=bright sunshine, f11=partly sunny, f8=hazy overcast, f5.6=overcast

Cameras have three basic controls to control exposure for light and shadow

Sensor/film speed: The ISO setting on your camera is for adjusting the sensitivity of the light meter. Low light generally requires a higher sensitivity (high ISO) and bright days generally require lower. The subject matter of your scene will ultimately determine what settings you need to use.

Shutter (Tv): The mechanism that determines how long light is exposed to the sensor/film. Controls motion.

Aperture (Av): The variable opening of the lens that admits light, measured in f-stops. Controls depth of field.

All of these controls impact the amount of light reaching the sensor/film—proper exposure.

Assignment

To photographically tell an action story, motion is key. Produce two images, properly exposed, showing motion: 1) an image showing sharp subject and blurred background and 2) an image with sharp background and the subject in motion with some blur—make sure the subject is recognizable.

Brent

Photography Workshop Session 2

Below is the abstract of today’s lesson plan. The assignment is at the bottom.

The Photographer and the Law: A quick review.

Copyright: Generally, the photographer owns the images, unless it is a work for hire situation. All is negotiable. Know your rights and who owns what before shooting and turning over images.

Privacy: Invasion of privacy is the most litigious. It may involve trespassing, photographing on private property without permission and other examples.

Libel: Libel is portraying someone in a false light in a publication. Slander is the oral/broadcast version. The best defense against libel or slander is the truth. If it’s true, it’s not libelous. You have to be able to prove that.

Commercial use of someone’s image: Just because you have an image of someone using a product doesn’t mean you can sell it. You have to have permission from the subject to use it for commercial purposes.

Types of images for storytelling:

There are five (some say more) types of images that a photographer uses to tell a story. Even though many or some of the images are not used, it’s best to have a variety of types. In the photo selection/editing process, the best images are used for illustrating or telling the story.

Overview: This is the shot that captures the complete setting. The subject matter is within the setting, and it gives the viewer a sense of context and substance.

Medium: This shot is closer in, and the subject is very clear. These are the shots that most get published, and it is because the action and relation to the subject is very apparent.

Closeup: This shot usually shows lots of detail of the subject, and little to none of the surroundings are evident or present. It is used to show the viewer detail of the subject.

Portrait: News rooms call them mug shots—head and shoulder. But a good photo can also be an environmental portrait that portrays the individual in their environment whatever that might be—office, school, studio, farmer in a barn, racer on the racetrack, etc.

Abstract: This image is usually more on the artsy side, but the content is related to the subject matter. It is usually shot very close up, and no surroundings or environment is contained in the image.

Assignment

Find an event or scene, and photograph it using the different types of images for storytelling. Use the skills you have learned for composition and rule of thirds. Images: overview, medium, close up, portrait, and an abstract also known as a detail shot.

Brent

How many angry Veterans are there?

The volunteer stood at the corner of intersecting hallways to give directions and assistance,
but one young Veteran was not satisfied with that.

Anger spewed from his mouth, as if the whole world was out to get him,
he needed to take the elevator to another floor.

Eight or nine men, most likely all Veterans themselves, waited for the elevator doors
to open, and then once inside, the doors closed, but nothing happened.

Again, anger spewed from the Veteran who was not making progress,
and all inside that box felt the tension, like something about to explode.

No one said a thing, except to say, “This one is acting up again.”
The doors opened and everyone exited to take a different elevator.

Some looked for other ways to get to the upper floors,
while the angry Veteran spewed more anger and waited for the next elevator.

How many angry war Veterans are there?
How many more wars will there be?

Brent

 

A Photography Workshop for Veterans

Next Tuesday, I am going to lead a photography workshop created for a group of Cincinnati Veterans. I’m excited about the opportunity to do a little teaching. Hoping for some feedback, and maybe your participation, I am going to post the workshop syllabus here, probably in shortened form. You can follow along, and participate on your own. Since this has already been distributed to the "class," here is the Photography Workshop Info.

Thanks for joining our first Veteran’s Photography Workshop. No matter what your skill level, you will learn something to help improve your photography skills and storytelling with images. This being the first workshop, there is a need to be flexible and tweak the sessions as we go along.

Despite what some may think, photographers do need to do a little writing. Photos need captions and additional information, and photo essays usually have some text or an essay that draws the whole story together. You are encouraged to publish your photos on Facebook, Tumblr, Google+ or other social media. If you have your own web site, feel free to publish your photography, AND feel free to write about the workshop.

There is one web site for publishing that is particularly good at this very use of photography. Take a look at www.Cowbird.com. You are encouraged to join Cowbird with a basic account (it’s free), and your photography and writing will get International exposure—maybe some love!

At the end of the workshop, we’ll look at all that we have done, and entertain the idea of creating an e-book, available to the public. This is to be determined. At our first session, we will determine the class needs and schedule.

Theme
“Winter into Spring” Obviously, the timing is right so let’s take advantage of the weather as the workshop begins in an unusual Winter and will end as Spring blossoms upon us. Winter into Spring can also be a metaphor for new growth, so your photography can focus on the symbolic Winter into Spring. There is no right or wrong subject matter as long as it stays within our theme framework.

Workshop Discussions
During our workshop meetings, we will be discussing a variety of topics: Cameras, lenses and accessories; types of images for storytelling; light and shadow; composition; using flash; etc.

Assignments
There will be photography assignments. These exercises are given to help you build upon your skills, and to give you an opportunity to start building a portfolio of images. Of course, there is no grade, and you do not have to turn in your assignments, but participating fully will give you the most benefit.

Critique
Although our photography can be deeply personal, critique or review has always been a photographic process where suggestions are offered to improve your photography. We’ll be looking at your photography and offering praise and suggestions for improvement.

Instructor
D. Brent Miller, Writer & Photographer