Photography Workshop Session 2

Below is the abstract of today’s lesson plan. The assignment is at the bottom.

The Photographer and the Law: A quick review.

Copyright: Generally, the photographer owns the images, unless it is a work for hire situation. All is negotiable. Know your rights and who owns what before shooting and turning over images.

Privacy: Invasion of privacy is the most litigious. It may involve trespassing, photographing on private property without permission and other examples.

Libel: Libel is portraying someone in a false light in a publication. Slander is the oral/broadcast version. The best defense against libel or slander is the truth. If it’s true, it’s not libelous. You have to be able to prove that.

Commercial use of someone’s image: Just because you have an image of someone using a product doesn’t mean you can sell it. You have to have permission from the subject to use it for commercial purposes.

Types of images for storytelling:

There are five (some say more) types of images that a photographer uses to tell a story. Even though many or some of the images are not used, it’s best to have a variety of types. In the photo selection/editing process, the best images are used for illustrating or telling the story.

Overview: This is the shot that captures the complete setting. The subject matter is within the setting, and it gives the viewer a sense of context and substance.

Medium: This shot is closer in, and the subject is very clear. These are the shots that most get published, and it is because the action and relation to the subject is very apparent.

Closeup: This shot usually shows lots of detail of the subject, and little to none of the surroundings are evident or present. It is used to show the viewer detail of the subject.

Portrait: News rooms call them mug shots—head and shoulder. But a good photo can also be an environmental portrait that portrays the individual in their environment whatever that might be—office, school, studio, farmer in a barn, racer on the racetrack, etc.

Abstract: This image is usually more on the artsy side, but the content is related to the subject matter. It is usually shot very close up, and no surroundings or environment is contained in the image.

Assignment

Find an event or scene, and photograph it using the different types of images for storytelling. Use the skills you have learned for composition and rule of thirds. Images: overview, medium, close up, portrait, and an abstract also known as a detail shot.

Brent

A Photography Workshop for Veterans

Next Tuesday, I am going to lead a photography workshop created for a group of Cincinnati Veterans. I’m excited about the opportunity to do a little teaching. Hoping for some feedback, and maybe your participation, I am going to post the workshop syllabus here, probably in shortened form. You can follow along, and participate on your own. Since this has already been distributed to the "class," here is the Photography Workshop Info.

Thanks for joining our first Veteran’s Photography Workshop. No matter what your skill level, you will learn something to help improve your photography skills and storytelling with images. This being the first workshop, there is a need to be flexible and tweak the sessions as we go along.

Despite what some may think, photographers do need to do a little writing. Photos need captions and additional information, and photo essays usually have some text or an essay that draws the whole story together. You are encouraged to publish your photos on Facebook, Tumblr, Google+ or other social media. If you have your own web site, feel free to publish your photography, AND feel free to write about the workshop.

There is one web site for publishing that is particularly good at this very use of photography. Take a look at www.Cowbird.com. You are encouraged to join Cowbird with a basic account (it’s free), and your photography and writing will get International exposure—maybe some love!

At the end of the workshop, we’ll look at all that we have done, and entertain the idea of creating an e-book, available to the public. This is to be determined. At our first session, we will determine the class needs and schedule.

Theme
“Winter into Spring” Obviously, the timing is right so let’s take advantage of the weather as the workshop begins in an unusual Winter and will end as Spring blossoms upon us. Winter into Spring can also be a metaphor for new growth, so your photography can focus on the symbolic Winter into Spring. There is no right or wrong subject matter as long as it stays within our theme framework.

Workshop Discussions
During our workshop meetings, we will be discussing a variety of topics: Cameras, lenses and accessories; types of images for storytelling; light and shadow; composition; using flash; etc.

Assignments
There will be photography assignments. These exercises are given to help you build upon your skills, and to give you an opportunity to start building a portfolio of images. Of course, there is no grade, and you do not have to turn in your assignments, but participating fully will give you the most benefit.

Critique
Although our photography can be deeply personal, critique or review has always been a photographic process where suggestions are offered to improve your photography. We’ll be looking at your photography and offering praise and suggestions for improvement.

Instructor
D. Brent Miller, Writer & Photographer

Dawn from my office

dawn-8Nov2013-1

I have posted many sunrise photographs from my home, all of them captured from my porch or patio attempting to include something different in the foreground with an impressive sunrise. I’ve never posted a sunrise photo from within the house. Until this morning. And actually, to be technical, this is the dawn—that time before the sun rises.

See you on the highway.

Brent

Early morning fog on Zoar Road

Cold air over warmer ground usually produces fog and photo opportunities. Having recently downloading Instagram on my cell phone, I thought I’d start playing with it. This is one of the first images. Click on the photo to visit my account.

IMG_20121116_085041

See you on the highway.

Brent

ABCD: A Blogger’s Centerline Day

I learned of this, today. It’s not too late for other bloggers to jump in, but there are rules.

This is the first annual ABCD, A Blogger’s Centerline Day, where all bloggers are invited to photograph themselves and a centerline. I assume that means a road or highway centerline. Gary France, of USA Tour on a Harley Davidson, conceived this project, and he posted the rules of engagement for participants. (Also posted below.)

So, I headed out with two cameras to grab a photo and participate in this online event. I was not looking for a photo op that would cause hearts to stop beating or people to swoon. I just wanted to participate. So, I stood on the centerline with my Canon PowerShot Pro 1 on a mini tripod atop a guard rail post, and used the remote control to capture a few frames.

Centerline-Brent

I have some favorite roads for quick, stress-releasing rides. One of them is Ohio SR 350 between US 22 and the town of Lebanon. In the middle of this section of highway, a sign appears, “Semi trucks and camper trailers prohibited.” That’s because the road becomes very curvy with hairpin turns as it goes down into the Little Miami River Valley and back out again. It’s true. A semi would never get through there. But, a motorcycle … no problem.

In this photo, I am on the western side of the Little Miami River, and the highway is at a steep, hairpin curve exciting the senses going up, and testing the nerves coming down the hill approaching the even steeper portion of the inside curve. It’s a fun highway to ride as are all of the roads along the Little Miami River.

The five rules are simple:

Rule 1 – the picture must be taken on 1st May 2011.
Rule 2 – the picture must be of yourself, and you must be a person that publishes a blog. You can include whatever else you like in the picture, including other people if you wish.
Rule 3 – the picture must include the centerline of a road.
Rule 4 – you should publish the picture on your blog on 1st May 2011, along with a few words about the picture and why you chose that location or pose.
Rule 5 – when you have posted the picture on your own blog, put a comment on http://garysusatour.blogspot.com/2011/04/abcd-will-you-take-part.html and include in that comment the address of your own blog post containing your own picture.

Later, Gary says he will be posting links and photos to all who participate. Take a look at the creativity of the online community.

See you on the highway.

Brent