High Desert Highway

High desert for miles around.
A highway cuts through it from horizon to horizon
with a town every 100 miles or so.
To some, it seems desolate.
To others, it is beautiful like no other place.
Storms to the rear have already doused the earth
with a cleansing rain, and the sweet smell of wet
sage brush fills the air to be taken in and savored.
It is the lonely road, the loneliest highway
that exposes you to this beauty.


Roads that intrigue

Are you intrigued by roads? Highways that seem to go off into the distance? Are you compelled to see what is down this road or that one?


I was talking with a friend about differences in roads. He lives in Montenegro, Europe. I’m here in the Cincinnati, Ohio area of the USA. It was my first Facebook video chat, and it was wonderful to finally see his face and hear his voice.

Goran says travel in Europe is quite different than the USA. The roads there are not like the United States where highways can be straight as an arrow, like out west, and you can see for miles. European roads are through mountains and valleys. The curves can reduce speed and require more time to travel. Our conversation gave me pause for thought about highways and roads, and their intrigue.

I have been known to turn down a road because it looks interesting. Where does it go? Where does it connect or come out? What will I see along its path?


Does it have lines? Lines? Yes, lines. Major highways and most roads have lane markings. But those rural country roads like Halls Creek Road (top photo) have no lines. To my knowledge and according to the Warren County map, it is such a minor road to serve the locals, that the county has not given it a County Route number. It is only known by its name. And of course, it meanders along Halls Creek, from whence its name comes.

What about gravel roads? Well, I’ve never seen anybody attempt lane markings on a gravel road. Would be kind of silly, wouldn’t it. But, that gravel road goes somewhere. A friend in Nevada, J. Brandon, says, “We have state routes that are gravel!”

That’s the intrigue of roads. There is a history and a purpose. And, they carry us forward to sights and sounds we might never have seen before. Roads are much more than a convenience for travel, they connect people to places and other people. They connect history and stories. And of course, they take us on our adventure.

If you want to get somewhere as fast as possible, take the interstate highway. But if you want to see anything, take a road less traveled. See where it leads.

See you on the highway.