Detour

The sign said, “detour, turn left. Road closed .8 miles ahead. Local traffic only.” The detour was also south and away from the intended northwesterly route. How far south would it go? How much of a detour will it be? All reasonable questions.

Life is like that. You come upon an unexpected obstacle and can follow the signs to get around it. Follow the path that someone else has laid out for you, and you will arrive … eventually. Usually, the route is not terrible, it’s intended to carry heavier traffic and yet more time consuming. It can be an inconvenience or a blessing. The detour will eventually take you around the obstacle and back onto your original route. But, the detour path is always somebody else’s idea.

What if there is another route? Where does the road to the right go? What will I discover? Will I get lost if I don’t follow the signs. Will it take longer? All reasonable questions.

There is an explorer in all of us. We all seek adventure to some degree. Granted, there may be adventure in following the signs, but the greater adventure is wandering through the countryside zigzagging down country roads. You may find twisty roads and a countryside dotted with farms. Horses in the pasture. Giant bales of hay freshly cut and rolled awaiting pick up. Clumps of crossroad buildings that carry a name, but are too small to be shown as a small town on the highway maps.

Yes, there is much to be discovered by not following the detour.

I turned right onto a freshly paved country road, and it made all the difference.

See you on the highway.

Brent

Motorcycling through Autumn

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I have a few favorite roads near my home—curvy, over hill and dale, and alongside a scenic river. These roads are perfect for motorcycling, but especially in the autumn.

The sun seems a little brighter, and the sky more blue as golden leaves fall from the trees. The wind on my face is crisp and refreshing. The motorcycle purrs along waiting for the throttle to be twisted. But, it is not to be.

The moment is surreal, not to be rushed but savored. This is motorcycling through autumn, and I am pacing myself, taking it all in to refresh my spirit.

See you on the highway.

Brent

Roads that intrigue

Are you intrigued by roads? Highways that seem to go off into the distance? Are you compelled to see what is down this road or that one?

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I was talking with a friend about differences in roads. He lives in Montenegro, Europe. I’m here in the Cincinnati, Ohio area of the USA. It was my first Facebook video chat, and it was wonderful to finally see his face and hear his voice.

Goran says travel in Europe is quite different than the USA. The roads there are not like the United States where highways can be straight as an arrow, like out west, and you can see for miles. European roads are through mountains and valleys. The curves can reduce speed and require more time to travel. Our conversation gave me pause for thought about highways and roads, and their intrigue.

I have been known to turn down a road because it looks interesting. Where does it go? Where does it connect or come out? What will I see along its path?

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Does it have lines? Lines? Yes, lines. Major highways and most roads have lane markings. But those rural country roads like Halls Creek Road (top photo) have no lines. To my knowledge and according to the Warren County map, it is such a minor road to serve the locals, that the county has not given it a County Route number. It is only known by its name. And of course, it meanders along Halls Creek, from whence its name comes.

What about gravel roads? Well, I’ve never seen anybody attempt lane markings on a gravel road. Would be kind of silly, wouldn’t it. But, that gravel road goes somewhere. A friend in Nevada, J. Brandon, says, “We have state routes that are gravel!”

That’s the intrigue of roads. There is a history and a purpose. And, they carry us forward to sights and sounds we might never have seen before. Roads are much more than a convenience for travel, they connect people to places and other people. They connect history and stories. And of course, they take us on our adventure.

If you want to get somewhere as fast as possible, take the interstate highway. But if you want to see anything, take a road less traveled. See where it leads.

See you on the highway.

Brent